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PostPosted: Tue Nov 01, 2016 4:53 pm 

Joined: Tue Feb 03, 2015 6:57 pm
Posts: 3331
Location: Low DOS
Selling CPUs
In all cases the X is for a number

8086 class:

4004 White or grey ceramic
Pins can be gold or grey (palladium/silver)

4040 white or grey ceramic
Must be gold pins (see below)

800X/808X white grey or brown ceramic
Must have gold pins and gold cap (see below)

80186 white ceramic
Dip design (long rectangle)
Gold pins and cap

Z8 black grey or blue ceramic
Gold cap on top
Gold cap on bottom
Gold pins

Motorola c20 grey ceramic
Large rectangle
Small gold cap
Gold pins
MUST be c20 only on single line

i80286/i803XX dual inline pin (dip)
Grey ceramic
Gold cap
Gold pins


386/486 class
Pin grid array PGA chips
Square Gold pins, gold cap underneath
80186
80286/80287
80386/80387/8087
Am386
Am486
Am586
Am47 (gold cap underneath see below)
Z80
Z8X
Z9
Rapid CAD
i960
i860
i990

Sparc (large square over 1.5 inches per side)
Sparc
Sparc II
RISC 16
Sparc 32
Sun 32

Motorola-60 series CPUs
Large long rectangles (dip)
Over 3 inches long
Gold cap on the centre top
Long gold trace down half of one side


Moto foreign gold caps
Fairly self explanatory has gold cap and gold pins.
Motorola CPUs (gold pins gold caps 68XX/68XXX)
Huge Motorola DIP CPUs
Hitachi
Sharp
Mitsubishi
Mitsushita
Etc

Also most single cap AT&T of the thick top cap variety (bottom cap CPUs go in Cyrix IBM)

Other 486 era gold caps specifically for this class, and do not go as 486
St 486
Green chip
Winchip5
UFC 486/487
SGS-T 486/487/80c486
IBM nickel top gold cap bottom 486/i960
Am47 silver pin gold cap
Am586/am5x86
Pentium overdrive single gold cap (remove fan)


Double gold cap CPUs
Gold pins two gold caps
Double cap 386/486 CPUs go as 8086 class
Double cap AMD am5XX CPUs go as 486
Basically this is the early pentium series, the i586 and i9XX series. Some AT&T CPUs
Sparc II
Sparc 64
RISC 64
Earlier ceramic PGA arm CPUs

The rare z80 with a silver cap and a gold cap can go here as well


Cyrix IBM Via gold caps
Also includes Texas Instruments (TI) CPUs
AT&T bottom gold caps
Zilog ceramics not mentioned above with a gold cap.
Winchip6
Many 6x86 and 686 CPUs
Palladium pin nickel cap CPUs of the 40XX and 80XX series Intel and AMD Am lines not mentioned above

Any black fibre CPU with a gold cap
All blue ceramics with a gold cap not mentioned above.

Any other gold gold cap CPU not mentioned above other than pentium pro (see below)


Pentium pro
MUST have gold cap!!!!!!
The capless ceramic and black fibre pentium pro CPUs go elsewhere


Pentium/MAC ceramics
Any ceramic CPU without a gold cap AND with gold pins except AMD and Cyrix
Capless pentium pro

AMD ceramic
Any AMD or Cyrix CPU with gold pins, no gold cap, and no metal heat spreader


AMD aluminium cap
Any ceramic CPU with gold pins and a metal (aluminium, nickel, or tungsten) heat spreader


Black fibre CPUs
Any black fibre CPU with gold or silver pins with or without a nickel spreader
Includes the black fibre pentium pro

P4/Mac green brown fibre no metal
Generally self explanatory
The CPU is a colour other than black. It has no metal spreader
Also includes surface mount "flat pack" (QFP) chips with the gold trace corner


Green fibre with metal
This one is a bit convoluted
Any fibre CPU that is not black and has gold pins; and a metal spreader

Any bus port CPU (Mac processors, IBM power processors, Dell servers). A bus port is a little larger than a credit card, has 1-3 CPUs (QFP) a ton of CMCs, and a large rectangular pin port (PGA)

Various other NOT quite slot processor designs


Pinless.
Almost any CPU without a gold cap and without pins.

Slot processors
Look like finger cards
Are thicker than standard finger cards
The gold finger is longer than standard PCI/PCIe cards.
The finger is etched into two rows. (3 rows on some late Xeon boards)


ICs
Any ceramic chip with 6 or more gold pins not covered above goes in pentium/Mac ceramic

Any chip with 6 or more non-gold pins that's fibre or plastic goes in ICs

Any plastic chip with gold pins needs to be reviewed, post a picture

Any ceramic chip with 6 or more non-gold pins must be reviewed, post a picture


Hope this helps. Post questions about the list below. To ask about specific CPUs please use the what is it threads.

_________________
-- my grades are my own and do not represent an offer from boardsort, nor are they guaranteed. Please keep that in mind.


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 22, 2017 11:42 am 
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Joined: Tue Aug 22, 2017 10:42 am
Posts: 10
Location: Virginia
I noticed that IC Chips are listed at $3.80 lb. "IC Chips" seems to be a little vague as to what you are looking for, then again, perhaps my understanding of what constitutes an IC Chip is a little more defined.

I have been taught to classify any flat, square or rectangular chip with pins (connectors) on two sides only as an IC (Integrated Circuit) Chip. Any flat, square or rectangular chip with pins (connectors) on four sides is classified as a "Flat Pack". Flap Packs are integrated circuit chips but contain more gold than them standard 2-sided ICC, hence the sub-category as a Flat Pack. The ICC actually encompass a very broad range of different chips and/or components, even a CPU falls under the broad ICC category, along with countless other type of components.

Obviously CPU's have their own sub-category as far as pricing is concerned but since you have not uploaded any pictures of what you consider to fit in the ICC category I have a question:

"When you say ICC do you mean with connectors on 4-sides, 2-sides or both?" Do you have a separate sub-catagory for "flat packs" that I am just not seeing?

What about North/South Bridges? where do they fit in on your pricing list?


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 22, 2017 3:09 pm 

Joined: Tue Feb 03, 2015 6:57 pm
Posts: 3331
Location: Low DOS
I fully agree with your assessment. Some of my earliest posts here were questioning just these issues.
What things are termed for recycling is very deferential to the tech terms.
Everything I've posted above is a chip I've actually sent in to boardsort, many more rare ones I had spoken to someone about personally.

I guess the easiest way to look at it is you have a list of "ICs" that have their own categories. The processors. Many ceramic gcpus also fall under the processor classes such as the 8064 and the still ubiquitous 8082/8084 pair of chips found on any high end AMD board to this day. Most keyboards that are wired have a 4235 and an 8087 inside. The old 8086 and some 286 chips can be found now, (being in the ic or AMD ceramic class now) on things like cd/DVD controllers or blu ray controllers in the later's case.

Any ICs that have gold pins will fall into the processor families. Any ceramic surface mount chips will be; green fibre no metal, AMD ceramic, or generic ic depending on the chip.

Using your bridge chips as an example, any smt (surface mount technology) ic that has the gold ribbon corner, what scrappers tend to cal flat packs because they're flat, will be green fibre no metal. The ones missing that gold corner go as IC.
I know, it's confusing. I still have to occasionally send an email to be sure on something. Things like DSP and OSPR chips (cameras, cell phones, scanners) break all the rules. And with the many tens of thousands of variations, authorised and otherwise, it gets confusing in many borderline cases.

When in doubt, simply post a picture and ask. That's the fastest way to know for sure.

_________________
-- my grades are my own and do not represent an offer from boardsort, nor are they guaranteed. Please keep that in mind.


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 22, 2017 8:36 pm 
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Joined: Tue Aug 22, 2017 10:42 am
Posts: 10
Location: Virginia
Thanks for the reply. I agree, technically, the fiber with the gold corner that attach direct to the MB (no legs or post on the sides) are "leadless" Fp's and the exception to the 4-sided perimeter connection rule. When I pull them I always separate the cap from the fiber base sort and process each piece individually for gold recovery. Right or wrong. I don't actually think of them as flat packs.

I get what you say as to scrap chip class vs actual chip class but the majority of flat packs are quads with connections only around the perimeter (all 4 sides of chip) such as: BQFP, BQFPH, CQFP, EQFP, FQFP, LQFP, MQFP, NQFP, PLCC, SQFP, TQFP, VQFP, VTQFP. However not all FP's are quads, some are leadless such as: DFP, PQFPN, QFN, HVQFN, TQFN, ODFN.

Now ICC's, that's a real mouth-full! As you know, many different components fall under the ICC heading and many of those have separate or dedicated sub-categories.

That being said instead of constantly having to answer questions and yes/.no to pictures every time someone want's to sell you what they know to be ICC's why not consider adding pictures showing what you accept as ICC's to the line item on the price list.That simple modification would take all the guess work out of the question and probably save you a lot of time answering the same question over and over again.

I see you are a Moderator so you probably know just who to discuss this with

Thanks again fro the reply.


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 22, 2017 10:22 pm 

Joined: Tue Feb 03, 2015 6:57 pm
Posts: 3331
Location: Low DOS
photos is a good place to start.

The discussion of logistics of getting photos done for all the various parts and classes is delaying a massive expansion of the gallery but it IS in the works. One of those eventually things.

_________________
-- my grades are my own and do not represent an offer from boardsort, nor are they guaranteed. Please keep that in mind.


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